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The Green Book 16

The Green Book 16

23 August 2020

Here we are, after a brief hiatus, with the continued serialisation of the Guide to Irish Writers of Gothic, Supernatural and Fantastic Literature, which I am co-editing with my long-time collaborator Jim Rockhill.

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The Long Reach of Green Shadows: Ray Bradbury’s Memories of Ireland

The Long Reach of Green Shadows: Ray Bradbury’s Memories of Ireland

22 August 2020

Ray Bradbury Introduction Bradbury’s work has been with me my entire life. I suspect my earliest encounter with his writing was through the television anthology series, The Ray Bradbury Theatre (1985-92); “The Banshee” was then, as now, one of my favourite episodes: Peter O’Toole starring as cocksure director, Charles Martin Smith as the precocious writer, terrified—like me, then as now—of what wailed in the grounds outside the big house. In middle school I read The Martian Chronicles, and my head cracked open with a sense of wonder for the Red Planet and beyond. I spent my adolescence scouring second-hand bookshops …

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Uncertainties 4: A Chat with Timothy J. Jarvis

Uncertainties 4: A Chat with Timothy J. Jarvis

10 August 2020

Conducted by Lynda E. Rucker Timothy J. Jarvis is a writer and scholar with an interest in the antic, the weird, the strange. His first novel, The Wanderer, was published by Perfect Edge Books in 2014. His short fiction has appeared in The Flower Book, The Shadow Booth Volume 1, The Scarlet Soul, The Far Tower,  Murder Ballads, and Uncertainties 1, among other places. He also writes criticism and reviews, and is co-editor of Faunus, the journal of the Friends of Arthur Machen.   Lynda: E. Rucker: First, I want to say how much I enjoyed this volume of Uncertainties! …

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In Deep League: A Conversation with B. Catling

In Deep League: A Conversation with B. Catling

7 July 2020

Portrait of B. Catling’s “Candleye” by David Tolley Conducted by Timothy J. Jarvis Peopled with richly drawn Dickensian grotesques and filled with bizarre and comical incident, Munky is as compelling as it is antic. Catling transports the reader to an interwar England in the throes of change. Part bizarre ghost story, part whimsical farce, part idiosyncratic literary experiment, it could be described as P. G. Wodehouse collaborating with Raymond Roussel, with a dash of M. R. James, if it weren’t so uniquely its own thing. B. Catling, RA, was born in London in 1948. He is a poet, sculptor, filmmaker, …

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Thoughts on “Lucifer and the Child” by Albert Power

Thoughts on “Lucifer and the Child” by Albert Power

10 June 2020

Those sensitive to mild spoilers may wish to avert their eyes. – Ed. In a ‘blurb’ for its new edition of Ethel Mannin’s novel Lucifer and the Child, the Swan River Press claims that this book was for many years on the list of ‘banned books’ in Ireland. If so, it was with good cause. This is a book that glamorises the Devil, irreligion and pursuit of the path of wickedness. It is an insidious book. It draws one in. It is a book that exerts a quiet and ensorcelling, but not a wholesome, power. Like Jenny Flower herself, it …

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The Green Book 15

The Green Book 15

30 May 2020

Consider this issue a special anthology issue, and an eclectic one at that. There is little to tie these pieces together, save for the fact each author grew from the soil of the same island at the edge of Europe, which is to say they are all Irish by birth.

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The Green Book 14

The Green Book 14

29 May 2020

EDITOR’S NOTE We encounter and enjoy authors mostly through their writing, forgetting sometimes that there are personalities behind their words, some astonishingly well-known in their time, often now relegated to small press rediscoveries. With sufficient spans of years, these authors and their personalities pass out of memory, becoming less familiar to us as people and more so as names on title pages. But it is important to remember that these authors lived and worked, had careers and relationships; some of them died while relatively unknown, others were widely celebrated for their creations. With this in mind, I’ve decided to focus …

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Thoughts on Small Press #6—Deluge of Submissions

Thoughts on Small Press #6—Deluge of Submissions

13 April 2020

Earlier this year, our friends over at Tartarus Press announced a call for submissions for their forthcoming 30th anniversary anthology. (Wow! Thirty years!!) The submissions window ran from 10 January until 10 April—a clean three months. Editor Rosalie Parker said on Twitter the other day that in that time, she received over five hundred stories. Five. Hundred. Stories. Yikes! In a previous “Thoughts on Small Press #2—What to Publish?”, I briefly talk about submissions. I mention that I’m generally not open for submissions, fearing I would be unable to handle the deluge. Looking at what Rosalie Parker has to sift …

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Thoughts on Small Press #5—Don’t Cut Corners

Thoughts on Small Press #5—Don’t Cut Corners

6 April 2020

My involvements with small presses have so far been only as a customer, and I’ve yet to have a really bad experience in dealing with any of them—just the occasional delay in shipment, usually for production reasons. Maybe I’ve been lucky, or I just have good taste in small presses. 🙂 The most annoying issue I’ve had with some small presses (not SRP) is poor proofreading and typography. I’ve seen books where the text was obviously scanned and OCR’d but never proofread at all, with errors on nearly every page, sometimes making it difficult to be sure what the author …

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Our Numbered Editions

Our Numbered Editions

5 April 2020

One of the things newcomers to Swan River Press might overlook are our numbered editions—and how they might go about getting one of them. The first one-hundred copies of each new book is issued with an embossed stamp, hand-numbered by yours truly. Often the numbered edition comes with a similarly numbered postcard (or postcards; also usually signed by the author if that’s something I can manage, and also only while supplies last). I believe the first book we did this for was Helen Grant’s The Sea Change & Other Stories (2013). By that point, I was casting around for ideas …

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Greetings from Plagueland

Greetings from Plagueland

26 March 2020

Update 8 May 2020: Hi Folks, I hope you’re all keeping well–or at least enjoying the good weather sensibly. I’m writing to update everyone on where I’m at with shipping Lucifer and the Child. The book tips the scales at the post office (it’s quite a jump in price too), so I’d been waiting on […]

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Merely the Natural Plus: Lucifer and the Child

Merely the Natural Plus: Lucifer and the Child

22 March 2020

This is the story of Jenny Flower, London slum child, who one day, on an outing to the country, meets a Dark Stranger with horns on his head. It is the first day of August — Lammas — a witches’ sabbath. Jenny was born on Hallowe’en, and possibly descended from witches herself . . . Once banned in Ireland by the Censorship of Publications Board, Lucifer and the Child is now available worldwide in this splendid new edition from Swan River Press featuring an introduction by Rosanne Rabinowitz and cover by Lorena Carrington. Ethel Mannin (1900-1984) was a best-selling author …

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