FORTHCOMING: Welcome to Dublin, the City of Ghosts and Guinness! The literary ghost story in all its guises has deep roots in Ireland – from the domestic hauntings of Mrs. Riddell's Weird Stories to the spectral disturbances of J.S. Le Fanu's In a Glass Darkly; from Elizabeth Bowen's urbane "Demon Lover" to Bram Stoker's blood-drenched and monolithic contribution to literature: Dracula. We invite you to join us at the Dublin Ghost Story Festival to raise a pint of the black stuff and celebrate literature of the supernatural — both past and present — in a city where some of the genre's most memorable nightmares were born. Slainte! More...



 
 


NEW TITLE: At the edges of everyday life, on geographical boundaries and in the margins of society, certainties and realities can wear thin. And if we find ourselves in such occult and outland territory late at night, we might glimpse phenomena out of the corner of our eye that cannot possibly be there. At such times even the past, apparently fixed and unchanging in memories and dreams, cannot be relied upon. But what happens if we find ourselves passing beyond even these frayed perimeters of life? Can others follow us, or are we on our own? And just where will our final journey take us? How can we perceive or understand the changes that death will bring? More...



 
 


FEATURED INTERVIEW: First and foremost Aickman is a great storyteller, but at his best he wrong-foots me as a reader, and shocks me. Just when I think I might understand him, and perhaps sympathise with his characters, he reminds me that we are fundamentally very different. The fact that the stories, and the author, are so open to (mis)interpretation makes me go back to him, time and time again. I want to understand him, although it is probably best that I don’t. Machen is very different. He is a magician with words. His love of the countryside and his fascination for the city both resonated with me when I left rural Sussex aged eighteen for the city of Sheffield, and his work still moves me profoundly. He has his faults as a writer (characterisation, mainly), but this is more than made up for by the depth of his vision and the power of his lyricism. More...



 
 


CURRENT ISSUE: Without question, Lord Dunsany (1878-1957) was one of the leading fantasists of the twentieth-century, fitting in somewhere between William Morris and J.R.R. Tolkien. As a writer he emerged fully formed, with an incomparable prose style and literary sensibilities that can only be described as sui generis. Dunsany’s writing is widely acknowledged as an influence on H.P. Lovecraft and Neil Gaiman, while his stories, novels, and plays are admired by luminaries such as Aleister Crowley, Arthur C. Clarke, Jorge Luis Borges, and Ursula Le Guin. And though Dunsany’s writing is held in high regard among readers of fantastic literature, his work is curiously not as widely read as it should be. More...




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