COVID-19: Updates concerning Swan River Press during the Covid-19 pandemic, with regard to orders and postal services: I hope you are all keeping well, being sensible, and looking after both yourselves and your community. All is well here at Swan River Press, or at well as can be expected. I am currently working from home (during the day now as well as weekends and evenings). Everything here is continuing apace: we’re working on new publications and shipments are still being dispatched to those in need of reading material. More...



 
 


NEW TITLE: This is the story of Jenny Flower, London slum child, who one day, on an outing to the country, meets a Dark Stranger with horns on his head. It is the first day of August — Lammas — a witches' sabbath. Jenny was born on Hallowe'en, and possibly descended from witches herself . . . Reminiscent of Machen's, "The White People", Lucifer and the Child is a tale of witchcraft — or is it? The author does not commit herself; merely stating that the story is open to natural explanation; alternatively, she invites "the willing suspension of disbelief". Once banned in Ireland by the Censorship of Publications Board, Lucifer and the Child is now available worldwide in this splendid new edition from Swan River Press. More...



 
 


FEATURED INTRODUCTION: Ethel Mannin (1900-1984) was a best-selling author who had written more than one hundred books but is virtually unknown today. Her output included fiction, journalism, short stories, travelogues, autobiography, and political analysis. All of her books have been out of print for decades — until now. Born into a working-class family in South London, Mannin was a lifelong socialist, feminist, and anti-fascist. In the 1930s she organised alongside the Russian-born American anarchist Emma Goldman in support of the Spanish anarchosyndicalist forces and their struggle against Franco. More...



 
 


CURRENT ISSUE: One perennial question about genre fiction centres around the notion of “tradition”: the influence authors and their works have on the next generation, and so on down the line. In posing this question, we ask whether or not an unbroken literary pedigree can be established. For example, an excessive amount of energy has been expended exploring links, both legitimate and spurious, between Le Fanu’s “Carmilla” (1871/2) and Stoker’s Dracula (1897) — and believe me, this seems to be an all-consuming pastime for some. But to me, Irish genre fiction has always seemed more a web of thematic shadows, authorial echoes, even social links, rather than a series of linear connections. More...




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