NEW TITLE: First collected in 1974, the stories in A Flutter of Wings span Mervyn Wall's entire writing career, dating back as far as the 1940s. Told in an easy style, tales such as "They Also Serve . . . " and "Adventure" offer the same satirical sensibilities found in Wall's classic novel The Unfortunate Fursey; while darker tales such as "Cloonaturk" and "The Demon Angler" are not without a hint of the grimly sardonic. In addition to an introduction by Val Mulkerns, this new edition boasts the uncollected Jamesian fragment "Extract from an Abandoned Novel", and Wall's early play, Alarm Among the Clerks, a savagely hilarious and ultimately brutal depiction of office life. More...



 
 


CURRENT ISSUE: Looking at this issueís eclectic contents, I am struck by the richness of Irelandís varied contributions to genre literature. Though a small island nation, we donít exist in a hermetically sealed literary bubble. Itís an obvious thing to say, really, but Irish literature has such a strong sense of itself that I sometimes have to remind myself of its kinship with the rest of the literary world. During one of my expeditions to the National Library, I happened upon a contemporary review of E.R. Eddisonís novel The Worm Ouroboros (1922) written by James Stephens, author of the classic fantasy novel The Crock of Gold. More...



 
 


FORTHCOMING: Welcome to Dublin, the City of Ghosts and Guinness! The literary ghost story in all its guises has deep roots in Ireland Ė from the domestic hauntings of Mrs. Riddell's Weird Stories to the spectral disturbances of J.S. Le Fanu's In a Glass Darkly; from Elizabeth Bowen's urbane "Demon Lover" to Bram Stoker's blood-drenched and monolithic contribution to literature: Dracula. We invite you to join us at the Dublin Ghost Story Festival to raise a pint of the black stuff and celebrate literature of the supernatural ó both past and present ó in a city where some of the genre's most memorable nightmares were born. Slainte! More...



 
 


FEATURED ESSAY: The book in which I have found most wisdom tells me that the motive for action should be in the action itself and not in the event, that is, the making of song, the painting of picture; for the natural delight we have in the doing should be the sole reason for doing, not because we desire it or ourselves to be remembered. The making of poetry should be naural with us as the blossoming of the hedgerows, and we should be as little concerned about what we have made as we have been when the beauty of twilight has passed, because another beauty begins. More...




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