FORTHCOMING: Welcome to Dublin, the City of Ghosts and Guinness! The literary ghost story in all its guises has deep roots in Ireland – from the domestic hauntings of Mrs. Riddell's Weird Stories to the spectral disturbances of J.S. Le Fanu's In a Glass Darkly; from Elizabeth Bowen's urbane "Demon Lover" to Bram Stoker's blood-drenched and monolithic contribution to literature: Dracula. We invite you to join us at the Dublin Ghost Story Festival to raise a pint of the black stuff and celebrate literature of the supernatural — both past and present — in a city where some of the genre's most memorable nightmares were born. Slainte! More...



 
 


NEW TITLE: An exiled recluse, an ancient abode in the remote west of Ireland, nightly attacks by malevolent swine-things from a nearby pit, and cosmic vistas beyond time and space. The House on the Borderland has been praised by China Mieville, Terry Pratchett, and Clark Ashton Smith, while H.P. Lovecraft wrote, “Few can equal [Hodgson] in adumbrating the nearness of nameless forces and monstrous besieging entities through casual hints and significant details, or in conveying feelings of the spectral and abnormal.” More...



 
 


FEATURED INTERVIEW: For Swan River’s new edition of The House on the Borderland, artist John Coulthart contributed ten illustrations, while musician Jon Mueller recorded a three-track album especially for issue with the book. Publisher Brian J. Showers discusses with the pair William Hope Hodgson, his classic novel, and its influence on their work. Brian J. Showers: Do you recall the first time you read William Hope Hodgson’s The House on the Borderland? John Coulthart: Yes, I was about twenty at the time. I’d been reading ghost and horror stories from the age of ten but it took me a while to get round to Hodgson . . . More...



 
 


CURRENT ISSUE: Without question, Lord Dunsany (1878-1957) was one of the leading fantasists of the twentieth-century, fitting in somewhere between William Morris and J.R.R. Tolkien. As a writer he emerged fully formed, with an incomparable prose style and literary sensibilities that can only be described as sui generis. Dunsany’s writing is widely acknowledged as an influence on H.P. Lovecraft and Neil Gaiman, while his stories, novels, and plays are admired by luminaries such as Aleister Crowley, Arthur C. Clarke, Jorge Luis Borges, and Ursula Le Guin. And though Dunsany’s writing is held in high regard among readers of fantastic literature, his work is curiously not as widely read as it should be. More...




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